The goal of this website is to educate everyone on the legitimate uses of marijuana.  It is also intended  to spread the word on a new initiative I have written in response to the many issues requiring clarification on California Proposition 19.  For those of you that didn't know, marijuana was legal for approximately 2700 years.  During that time, it was used by medical persons worldwide because of it's medicinal value.  It has only been illegal in the United States of America for approximately 70 years.  The basis of making this medication illegal was, and still is warrant less.  Below is a copy of the rough draft of my current initiative.  It will still require some changes.  It is my goal to make sure that marijuana is made legal for its medicinal values.  I am medically retired from law enforcement, and also believe that there should be no reason for marijuana to remain illegal.  I do believe it should still be controlled, however, it is NOT the dangerous drug that it is made out to be by the Federal Government, and other Governments around the world.  The benefits of marijuana far outweigh any negative aspects of the medication.  It is much safer to use than prescription medications and over the counter medications currently approved by the Federal Drug Administration.  It has limited affects on the human body and it's organs.  There is much less risk for kidney, liver, pancreas, and other organ problems associated with "approved" pharmaceutical products currently being used.  Marijuana can be habit forming, however, it is NOT addictive as many would have you to believe.  Please take the time to read my proposal.  I welcome all constructive feedback and constructive criticism.  I can be reached at
 

legalizeCA420@hotmail.com.  If you decide that you agree with what is contained in the following text of my rough draft initiative, and you would like to be an official supporter, please email me at the above email address with your full name, address, and telephone number.  I will not share any of this information.  I will only keep it as my records for legal reasons.  If you decide to be an official supporter, I will list your name and city (California residents only) in the text of the drafted initiative.  Thank you all for taking the time to read this information.
The following are excerpts from my draft:

Legalize and Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act (2011)



This proposition, also known as the Legalize and Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act of 2011, is a proposition which is requested to be on the November 2011 California statewide ballot as an initiated state statute.
This proposition, if approved by voters, will legalize various marijuana-related activities, allow local governments to regulate these activities, permit state governments and local governments to impose and collect marijuana-related fees and taxes, and authorize various criminal and civil penalties. As with Senate Bill 420, local governments may increase the amounts specified as the limits allowed by law. The official proponent of the measure is Eric Ashworth. Eric Ashworth is the official advocate for the initiative.

Opposition
Voting on Marijuana

Statewide measures

Local measures

2010 • 2009 • 2008
2006 • 2004 • 2002
2000 • 1999 • 1998
1997 • 1996
1990 • 1972

Marijuana news

Groups who oppose this Proposition:

Arguments against

Federal laws?

Marijuana is illegal under federal laws. If marijuana becomes legal in California under state law, it will still be federally illegal. The U.S. Supreme has previously ruled that federal agents can arrest medical marijuana users and growers even though Proposition 215 makes that behavior legal in California.
Legal scholars, considering what might happen if marijuana is fully legalized in California, have said:
• The federal government would not be able to require California law enforcement agencies to help them enforce the federal law.
• Federal law enforcement officers can continue to arrest and prosecute the use, sale or possession of marijuana in California.
• As a matter of practice, most marijuana arrests are made by state law enforcement officers. In 2008, there were 847,000 marijuana-related arrests throughout the country. About 6,300 of these arrests were performed by federal agents. That's less than 1% of all marijuana arrests. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
Polling information
See also: Polls, 2010 ballot measures
• The Field Poll released survey results in April 2009 which indicated that 56% of Californians support legalizing marijuana. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
• In July 2010, a new Field Poll taken between June 22-July 5 showed that more voters oppose (48%) than support (44%) Proposition 19. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
• A poll by EMC Research in January 2010 was said to show that so-called "soccer moms" support marijuana legalization, although exact polling information from this poll was not released to the public. EMC Research was retained to do the poll by legalization supporters. A newspaper report said that affluent suburban mothers support legalization because they believe their adult children can buy marijuana in greater safety if marijuana is legal. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)


• A poll by SurveyUSA of 500 adults in April 2010 showed 56% were in favor of legalizing marijuana. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
• A PPIC poll on marijuana legalization in mid-May showed a very close match-up in sentiment between support and opposition. There were demographic differences, however: 62% of Latinos oppose legalization, men favor legalization more than women, and support for legalization declines with age. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
• A poll by Public Policy Polling of 614 California voters shows that 52% polled are in favor of legalizing marijuana. Also according to the poll, 38% said they've smoked marijuana. 44% of those who haven't still support legalization. Democrats are more likely to support legalization. In contradiction to other polls, African Americans are the strongest supporters of legalization at 68:32. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
Date of Poll Pollster In favor Opposed Undecided
July 8-11, 2010
SurveyUSA
50% 40% 11
April 20, 2010 SurveyUSA
56% 42% 3
May 9-16, 2010 PPIC
49% 48% 3
June 22-July 5, 2010 Field
44% 48% 8
July 23-25, 2010 PPP
52% 36% 12

Path to the ballot
See also: California signature requirements
This person intends to file the proposed initiative with the California Secretary of State for 2011 ballot measures that would legalize marijuana.
• Eric Ashworth has written the language for this proposition on August 29, 2010. This measure is also known as the Legalize and Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act of 2011. Supporters of this measure will have collected an excessively large amount of signatures by the end of 2010.

Medical marijuana is already legal in California, due to the enactment of Proposition 215 in 1996. California's voters rejected a previous ballot initiative to legalize marijuana in 1972, when 1972's Proposition 19 was rejected by a margin of 66-33%.
Text and title
See also: Complete text of The Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act of 2010 (California) and Ballot titles, summaries and fiscal statements for California's 2010 ballot propositions. For purposes of this initiative, the above information will be used for any monetary calculations of impact, whether or not the financial impact is positive or negative.

Ballot title:

Legalizes Marijuana Under California but not Federal Law.
Permits State Governments to Regulate and Tax Commercial Production, Distribution, and Sale of Marijuana.
Initiative Statute.
In addition, Local Governments MAY increase the designated permitted limits, but MAY NOT decrease the limits enacted as law.

Official summary:
Allows people 18 years old or older (as well as any active members of the military and inactive/former members of the military who terminated their service on other than negative terms regardless of age) to possess, cultivate, or transport marijuana for personal use. Permits the state government to regulate and tax commercial production and sale of marijuana to people 18 years old or older, and any active members of the military and inactive/former members of the military who terminated their service on other than negative terms regardless of age.
Prohibits people from possessing marijuana on school grounds, using it in public places where smoking is prohibited, or providing it to anyone under 18 years old, and any active members of the military and inactive/former members of the military who terminated their service on other than negative terms regardless of age.
Maintains current prohibitions against driving/operating a motor vehicle while impaired.
Summary of estimated fiscal impact:
Savings of up to several tens of millions of dollars annually to state and local governments on the costs of incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Unknown but potentially major tax, fee, and benefit assessment revenues to state and local government related to the production and sale of marijuana products.([3] As per information from Proposition 19)
Effects of the bill
According to the State of California analysis, the bill will have the following effects.([1] As per information from Proposition 19
Legalization
• Persons over the age of 18, and any active members of the military and inactive/former members of the military who terminated their service on other than negative terms regardless of age, may possess up to four ounces of marijuana for personal consumption.
• May use marijuana in a non-public place such as a residence or a public establishment licensed for on site marijuana consumption. May consume marijuana in a public place where smoking is allowed. Portable electronic vaporizers only shall have the same restrictions as electronic cigarettes. By electronic, it is to be understood that the vaporizer must have a self-contained power source. Hardwired and corded vaporizers are not included in this section.
• Hardwired and corded vaporizers shall be legal in non-public places such as a residence, a public establishment licensed for on site marijuana consumption, and business establishments designated to allow smoking. Local governments shall continue to have the right to limit how many of these establishments can be licensed in their municipalities.
• Local governments, and the state government, shall not place restrictions on businesses already licensed to allow smoking. Business owners shall have the right to refuse the use of marijuana on their premises. Businesses that allow smoking shall not supply any marijuana to any persons, unless the business is covered under Proposition 215, and Senate Bill 420.
• May grow marijuana at a private residence not to exceed 3 mature female plants for personal use.
• Patients covered under Proposition 215 and Senate Bill 420 shall maintain their current rights. Limits for medical patients shall increase to twelve mature female plants. Immature plants, male plants, clones, and seedlings will have no limit. Edibles and concentrates, which are both legal for medical marijuana patients, shall continue to remain legal.
• Patients limits for possession shall increase to 2 pounds of dry flowers, not including seeds and stems.
• Patients shall have no limit on the amount of edibles, tinctures, lotions, salves, and concentrates, or any other legitimate, and safely, manufactured medical products that contain marijuana and/or any derivatives of marijuana.
• Patients shall not violate State Law by manufacturing said edibles, tinctures, lotions, salves, and concentrates, or any other legitimate safely manufactured medical products that contain marijuana and/or any derivatives of marijuana. Water, or similar substances, and ethyl alcohol may be used for the conversion process of concentrates, tinctures, lotions, salves, or any other legitimate safely manufactured medical products that contain marijuana and/or any derivatives of marijuana. The manufacturing of edibles shall be legal as long as they are made in the safe manner required by certified kitchens operating in the State of California.
• A certified kitchen shall not be required for edibles, tinctures, lotions, salves, and concentrates, and any other legitimate, and safely, manufactured medical products that contain marijuana and/or any derivatives of marijuana that is manufactured for personal use only.
• If it is determined that the manufacturing of these said items was done in a grossly unsafe manner or with the use of illegal chemicals or substances, the penalties relative to California Health and Safety Code 11379.6(a), as well as related sections, shall apply.
Legal ways to dispense of excess marijuana
• All persons who comply with the sections specified in this proposition shall be able to sell their excess marijuana to state licensed facilities.
• All persons shall be allowed to donate their excess marijuana to medical facilities, collectives, dispensaries, and any other non-profit organization that is permitted under the laws of the State of California to possess, sell, transport, cultivate, or in any other way be legally able to disperse marijuana. Donations may be received by the person donating the marijuana.
• Medical marijuana patients shall continue to be able to be allowed the laws and rights afforded them as per California Proposition 215 and California State Senate Bill 420.
• All income generated by the sales, and donations received, of marijuana shall be subject to taxes specified in this proposition allowed, and set forth, by the State of California.
Local government regulation
• Local government shall authorize the retail sale of up to 1 ounce of marijuana per transaction, and regulate the hours and location of the business.
• Local government may authorize larger amounts of marijuana for personal possession, cultivation, and transportation, or for commercial cultivation, transportation, and sale.
• Local Government shall not decrease the amounts set forth by state law.
• Allows for the transportation of marijuana from a legal premise in one city or county to a legal premise in another city or county, without regard to local laws of intermediate localities to the contrary.
State taxes and fees
• Allows the collection of taxes specifically to allow the state government to raise revenue or to offset any costs associated with marijuana regulation. This amount shall not exceed the current tax amount, at the time, of tobacco and alcohol, whichever is higher.
• Local governments may only increase the tax amount set forth by the State of California as long as the increase in taxes does not exceed those taxes of tobacco and alcohol – whichever is higher.
Local taxes and fees
• The amount of taxes to be implemented and collected by the state shall not exceed the current tax amount, at the time, of tobacco and alcohol, whichever is higher. The state may authorize local governments to raise taxes on marijuana to the limit as described if the state chooses to tax marijuana at a lower tax base. At no time shall the tax be higher than the taxes applied to tobacco and alcohol.
Criminal and civil penalties
• Maintains existing laws against selling drugs to a minor and driving under the influence.
• Maintains an employer's right to address consumption of marijuana that affects an employee's job performance.
• Prohibits an employer from refusing to hire an employee, or terminate a current employee, based solely on whether or not the employee uses marijuana. Current laws, policies, and regulations relating to being under the influence while working shall continue to remain the same.
• Maintain existing laws against interstate or international transportation of marijuana.
• Honor medical regulations from other states where marijuana is currently legal for medical purposes.
• Any person who is licensed, permitted or authorized to sell marijuana, who knowingly sells or gives away marijuana to someone under the age of 18, results in them being banned from owning, operating, or being employed by a licensed marijuana establishment for one year.
• Any person who is licensed, permitted or authorized to sell marijuana, who knowingly sells or gives away marijuana to someone younger than the age of 18, may be imprisoned in county jail for up to six months and fined up to $1,000 per offense.
• Any person who is licensed, permitted or authorized to sell marijuana, who knowingly sells or gives away marijuana to someone under the age of 16, shall be imprisoned in state prison for a period of three, four, or five years.
• Any person who is licensed, permitted or authorized to sell marijuana, who knowingly sells or gives away marijuana to someone under the age of 14, shall be imprisoned in state prison for a period of three, five, or seven years
Fiscal impact
In the time leading to 2010, California's state government's budget deficit has grown to be the largest of all American states. The California legislature has estimated that taxing the previously untaxed domestically grown $14 billion marijuana market would produce $1.4 billion a year,[4] Taxing marijuana, supporters say, could be a smart way to help alleviate pressure on the state budget.[5]
According to the California Legislative Analyst's Office, the following fiscal impact would result from the bill.[6]
• Result in significant savings to state and local governments, potentially up to several tens of millions of dollars annually due to reduction of individuals incarcerated, on probation or on parole.
• Cells currently being used to house marijuana offenders could be used for other criminals, many of whom are now being released early because of a lack of jail space.
• Reduction in state and local costs for enforcement of marijuana-related offenses and the handling of related criminal cases in the court system, providing the opportunity for funds to be used to enforce other existing criminal laws. The RAND Corporation has found that law enforcement costs for marijuana enforcement are approximately $300 million a year.
• Potential increase in the costs of substance abuse programs due to speculated increase in usage of marijuana, possibly having the effect of reducing spending on mandatory treatment for some criminal offenders, or result in the redirection of these funds for other offenders.
• There would be a reduction in fines collected under current state law but a possible increase in local civil fines authorized by existing local laws.
• The cumulative effect on fines is largely unknown.

Supporters

1 Eric Ashworth – Mira Loma
2 Sebuh Honarchian – Woodland Hills

Arguments in favor

If passed by the voters on November, 2011, supporters argue that this Proposition will:
• Reduce the racial bias in cannabis arrests
• Create between 60,000 and 110,000 new jobs in California
• Generate between $1.2 billion and $1.4 billion in new direct tax revenue annually (estimated from information contained in California Proposition 19)
• Expand California's economy by between $16 billion and $23 billion annually (estimated from information contained in California Proposition 19)
• Reduce crime in California
• Reduce violence in California and Mexico
• Free up law enforcement resources to focus on violent crime and property crime.
• Reduce environmental damage to California's public lands from illegal grow operations.
• Reduce prison costs and prison overcrowding
• Reduce funding to drug cartels, who currently get about 70% of their revenue from illegal cannabis sales (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
Reduce police corruption(based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
• Improve the relationship between police and the communities they serve
• Reduce alcohol's cost to society by allowing adults to choose a safer alternative
Sebuh Neuromancer Honarchian
Approximately 40% of each tax dollar collected in the united states of America goes towards military spending. Tax marijuana to spend money on conquwring nations like Afghanistan so the us military can export opium to the usa for what? Scre...w that let us grow our own plants so we can prosper on our own. George Washington had some of the hugest hemp plantations, used for rope, oil, paper, canvas for sails, and much more. Marijuana can produce paper better than many other plants. stop focusing on the mind numbing effects and realize that the plant has infinite uses. [1] [2]

Opposition

Voting on Marijuana

Statewide measures

Local measures

2010 • 2009 • 2008
2006 • 2004 • 2002
2000 • 1999 • 1998
1997 • 1996
1990 • 1972

Marijuana news

Groups who oppose this Proposition:
Arguments against
Federal laws?
Marijuana is illegal under federal laws. If marijuana becomes legal in California under state law, it will still be federally illegal. The U.S. Supreme has previously ruled that federal agents can arrest medical marijuana users and growers even though Proposition 215 makes that behavior legal in California.
Legal scholars, considering what might happen if marijuana is fully legalized in California, have said:
• The federal government would not be able to require California law enforcement agencies to help them enforce the federal law.
• Federal law enforcement officers can continue to arrest and prosecute the use, sale or possession of marijuana in California.
• As a matter of practice, most marijuana arrests are made by state law enforcement officers. In 2008, there were 847,000 marijuana-related arrests throughout the country. About 6,300 of these arrests were performed by federal agents. That's less than 1% of all marijuana arrests. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
Polling information
See also: Polls, 2010 ballot measures
• The Field Poll released survey results in April 2009 which indicated that 56% of Californians support legalizing marijuana. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
• In July 2010, a new Field Poll taken between June 22-July 5 showed that more voters oppose (48%) than support (44%) Proposition 19. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
• A poll by EMC Research in January 2010 was said to show that so-called "soccer moms" support marijuana legalization, although exact polling information from this poll was not released to the public. EMC Research was retained to do the poll by legalization supporters. A newspaper report said that affluent suburban mothers support legalization because they believe their adult children can buy marijuana in greater safety if marijuana is legal. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)

• A poll by SurveyUSA of 500 adults in April 2010 showed 56% were in favor of legalizing marijuana. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
• A PPIC poll on marijuana legalization in mid-May showed a very close match-up in sentiment between support and opposition. There were demographic differences, however: 62% of Latinos oppose legalization, men favor legalization more than women, and support for legalization declines with age. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
• A poll by Public Policy Polling of 614 California voters shows that 52% polled are in favor of legalizing marijuana. Also according to the poll, 38% said they've smoked marijuana. 44% of those who haven't still support legalization. Democrats are more likely to support legalization. In contradiction to other polls, African Americans are the strongest supporters of legalization at 68:32. (based on information contained in California Proposition 19)
Date of Poll Pollster In favor Opposed Undecided
July 8-11, 2010
SurveyUSA
50% 40% 11
April 20, 2010 SurveyUSA
56% 42% 3
May 9-16, 2010 PPIC
49% 48% 3
June 22-July 5, 2010 Field
44% 48% 8
July 23-25, 2010 PPP
52% 36% 12

Path to the ballot
See also: California signature requirements
This person intends to file the proposed initiative with the California Secretary of State for 2011 ballot measures that would legalize marijuana.
• Eric Ashworth has written the language for this proposition on August 29, 2010. This measure is also known as the Legalize and Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act of 2011. Supporters of this measure will have collected an excessively large amount of signatures by the end of 2010.
Supporters of the Legalize and Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act of 2011 campaign currently plan to launch their signature-collection campaign in September or October of 2010 in Southern California.

Nobody has been paid any moneys to date to collect signatures to qualify this proposition for the 2011 ballot.
The California Secretary of State has not published an interim report on the random sampling status of signature validating to date.





End Marijuana Prohibition